Tuesday, September 4, 2012

NEW ORLEANS: Nine Anti-Gay Preachers Arrested At Southern Decadence

Greater New Orleans reports:

Nine preachers were arrested Saturday after police said they yelled anti-gay slurs over bullhorns during a demonstration at Southern Decadence, an annual celebration of gay culture in theFrench Quarter. Patrick O’Connell, 45, Rolando Igleasias, 31, Cesar Chavez, 22, Daniel Hoogerhuis, 26, Danny Guevera, 20, Larry Craft, 52, Montes Diego, 32 and Gary Brown, 33 were arrested on suspicion of aggressive solicitation, a city law passed last October.The ordinance prohibits “any person or group of persons to loiter or congregate on Bourbon Street for the purpose of disseminating any social, political or religious message between the hours of sunset and sunrise.” Another man, Justin Craft, 31, was arrested on suspicion of battery, resisting an officer and interfering with a law enforcement investigation. Craft allegedly punched an officer when he attempted to confiscate his bullhorn. Witnesses said the incident occurred around 8:30 p.m. outside Tropical Isle.New Orleans police spokesman Frank Robertson said the men were previously warned not to use bullhorns, but did not comply. Casey Kolosky, a bouncer at Tropical Isle, said the preachers were making slurs against gays and also mentioned Hurricane Katrina victims.French Quarter activist Leo Watermeier, who has long opposed the vitriolic demonstrations by religious fundamentalists at Decadence, took pictures of the incident outside of Tropical Isle. Some of the preachers carried signs tagged with officialstreetpreachers.com, but police said they did not know the exact organization the men represented.The Vieux Carre Assembly of God Church in the French Quarter usually allows the preachers to use the church as a base where they can get water and rest, said Pastor Paul Gros, who said he believes the city ordinance violates their free speech rights. “I’m not saying I approve of everything they say and do,” Gros said.Watermeier said he supports the preachers’ free speech rights, but “this seems a genuine effort by NOPD to respect the preachers’ right to free speech while recognizing others’ right to be free from unreasonable harassment.”
Thursday, June 28, 2012
GEORGIA: Anti-Gay Counseling Student Jennifer Keeton Loses Suit Against School
Joe.My.God. reports:
A federal court in Georgia has ruled that Augusta State University acted properly when it expelled counseling student Jennifer Keeton for refusing to treat LGBT patients. Keeton and Michigan student Julea Ward, who has a similar case still pending, have become martyrs for the anti-gay hate industry. From the ruling:

Keeton’s conflation of personal and professional values, or at least her difficulty in discerning the difference, appears to have been rooted in her opinion that the immorality of homosexual relations is a matter of objective and absolute moral truth. The policies which govern the ethical conduct of counselors, however, with their focus on client welfare and self-determination, make clear that the counselor’s professional environs are not intended to be a crucible for counselors to test metaphysical or moral propositions. Plato’s Academy or a seminary the Counselor Program is not; that Keeton’s opinions were couched in absolute or ontological terms does not give her constitutional license to make it otherwise.

GEORGIA: Anti-Gay Counseling Student Jennifer Keeton Loses Suit Against School

Joe.My.God. reports:

A federal court in Georgia has ruled that Augusta State University acted properly when it expelled counseling student Jennifer Keeton for refusing to treat LGBT patients. Keeton and Michigan student Julea Ward, who has a similar case still pending, have become martyrs for the anti-gay hate industry. From the ruling:
  • Keeton’s conflation of personal and professional values, or at least her difficulty in discerning the difference, appears to have been rooted in her opinion that the immorality of homosexual relations is a matter of objective and absolute moral truth. The policies which govern the ethical conduct of counselors, however, with their focus on client welfare and self-determination, make clear that the counselor’s professional environs are not intended to be a crucible for counselors to test metaphysical or moral propositions. Plato’s Academy or a seminary the Counselor Program is not; that Keeton’s opinions were couched in absolute or ontological terms does not give her constitutional license to make it otherwise.
Wednesday, June 6, 2012
CALIFORNIA: State’s Fair Political Practices Commission To Investigate NOM
Joe.My.God. reports:
Thank to a persistent campaign of complaints by GOP presidential candidate Fred Karger, the California Fair Political Practices Commission will investigate NOM for campaign finance violations. Via press release from Fred Karger:

In his sworn complaint of May 17th, Karger alleged that NOM did not report over $340,000 that it raised to pass Proposition 8 four years ago. California joins the state of Maine which is in its third year of its investigation of NOM, the leading anti-gay marriage organization in the country.One of the 11 missing contributions was $10,000 from presumptive GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney’s Alabama PAC. In addition to the Romney money there were 10 more contributions NOM did not report, including: $150,000 from Michael Casey of Jamestown, RI, $100,000 from Sean Fiedler of New York, NY and $25,000 from NOM Board member Craig Cardon of Mesa, AZ, a General Authority in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormon Church).

CALIFORNIA: State’s Fair Political Practices Commission To Investigate NOM

Joe.My.God. reports:

Thank to a persistent campaign of complaints by GOP presidential candidate Fred Karger, the California Fair Political Practices Commission will investigate NOM for campaign finance violations. Via press release from Fred Karger:
  • In his sworn complaint of May 17th, Karger alleged that NOM did not report over $340,000 that it raised to pass Proposition 8 four years ago. California joins the state of Maine which is in its third year of its investigation of NOM, the leading anti-gay marriage organization in the country.One of the 11 missing contributions was $10,000 from presumptive GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney’s Alabama PAC. In addition to the Romney money there were 10 more contributions NOM did not report, including: $150,000 from Michael Casey of Jamestown, RI, $100,000 from Sean Fiedler of New York, NY and $25,000 from NOM Board member Craig Cardon of Mesa, AZ, a General Authority in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormon Church).
Monday, April 23, 2012
United Kingdom: Homophobic Killer’s Appeal Refused In Northen Ireland 
Pink News UK reports: 

A man who was jailed for the homophobic murder of a gay man in Northern Ireland has been denied the chance to appeal the judgment.
The case concerns Shaun Fitzpatrick, a 32-year old openly gay supermarket boss, who was attacked on his way home from a bar in Dungannon, County Tyrole, in March 2008. Ramunas Balseris, 28, and Andrius Dunauskas, 25, who are both Lithuanian, were convicted of Mr Fitzpatrick’s murder in March 2010. The trial judge also recommended that the men be deported after serving at least 20 years in prison.
The Court of Appeal dismissed Mr Balseris’s challenge upon finding compelling evidence that he was involved in beating the victim to death. Mr Fitzpatrick was kicked and stamped on during two separate assaults, suffering as a result 52 different injuries all over his body.
The judge said that even if Mr Dunauskas inflicted most of the injuries, allegations that Mr Balseris stood smoking during the second attack was “chilling evidence of his callous disregard for their victim.”
Lawyers for the defendant have argued however that his conviction was “unsafe” and should be set aside. They also suggested that evidence of bad character — that Mr Balseris shouted angrily at Mr Fitzpatrick, “I’m not gay” at a bar in May 2007 — was wrongly presented.
Lord Justice Coghlin however refuted these arguments, saying that the incident provided a very relevant background to the case, with which the jury had been able to conclude that he had taken a much more active part in the crime than he had been prepared to admit.
A second hearing to challenge the length of the sentence will occur in June.

United Kingdom: Homophobic Killer’s Appeal Refused In Northen Ireland 

Pink News UK reports: 

A man who was jailed for the homophobic murder of a gay man in Northern Ireland has been denied the chance to appeal the judgment.

The case concerns Shaun Fitzpatrick, a 32-year old openly gay supermarket boss, who was attacked on his way home from a bar in Dungannon, County Tyrole, in March 2008. Ramunas Balseris, 28, and Andrius Dunauskas, 25, who are both Lithuanian, were convicted of Mr Fitzpatrick’s murder in March 2010. The trial judge also recommended that the men be deported after serving at least 20 years in prison.

The Court of Appeal dismissed Mr Balseris’s challenge upon finding compelling evidence that he was involved in beating the victim to death. Mr Fitzpatrick was kicked and stamped on during two separate assaults, suffering as a result 52 different injuries all over his body.

The judge said that even if Mr Dunauskas inflicted most of the injuries, allegations that Mr Balseris stood smoking during the second attack was “chilling evidence of his callous disregard for their victim.”

Lawyers for the defendant have argued however that his conviction was “unsafe” and should be set aside. They also suggested that evidence of bad character — that Mr Balseris shouted angrily at Mr Fitzpatrick, “I’m not gay” at a bar in May 2007 — was wrongly presented.

Lord Justice Coghlin however refuted these arguments, saying that the incident provided a very relevant background to the case, with which the jury had been able to conclude that he had taken a much more active part in the crime than he had been prepared to admit.

A second hearing to challenge the length of the sentence will occur in June.

Monday, March 19, 2012

Wednesday, February 29, 2012

USA: Harvard Students Demand Gay Reparations From School

The Advocate reports:

Harvard students are demanding university officials take responsibility for a 1920s-era secret court that expelled students for being gay or being perceived as such.The students will protest at the Massachusetts Ivy League institution on Wednesday afternoon — they’re asking for the university to award posthumous degrees to the seven expelled students and to abolish the still-active secret court. The protest will coincide with an event at Harvard to announce the official launch of Lady Gaga’s Born this Way Foundation—Oprah Winfrey and Deepak Chopra are on the guest list. “We’re challenging the Harvard community to live us to its mission to ‘liberate students to explore, to create, to challenge, and to lead… to advance knowledge, to promote understanding, and to serve society,’” Kaia Stern, a visiting Harvard faculty member and supporter of Their Day in the Yard, a movement on campus to raise awareness about the secret court’s actions, said in a release.Aside from the protest, a petition is circulating on Change.org that urges university officials take formal action against the expulsion.

USA: Harvard Students Demand Gay Reparations From School

The Advocate reports:

Harvard students are demanding university officials take responsibility for a 1920s-era secret court that expelled students for being gay or being perceived as such.

The students will protest at the Massachusetts Ivy League institution on Wednesday afternoon — they’re asking for the university to award posthumous degrees to the seven expelled students and to abolish the still-active secret court. The protest will coincide with an event at Harvard to announce the official launch of Lady Gaga’s Born this Way Foundation—Oprah Winfrey and Deepak Chopra are on the guest list. 

“We’re challenging the Harvard community to live us to its mission to ‘liberate students to explore, to create, to challenge, and to lead… to advance knowledge, to promote understanding, and to serve society,’” Kaia Stern, a visiting Harvard faculty member and supporter of Their Day in the Yard, a movement on campus to raise awareness about the secret court’s actions, said in a release.

Aside from the protest, a petition is circulating on Change.org that urges university officials take formal action against the expulsion.

Tuesday, February 7, 2012
 
CALIFORNIA: Prop 8 Ruled Unconstitutional!!!

However, Prop. 8 stays in place:

CALIFORNIA: Prop 8 Ruled Unconstitutional!!!

However, Prop. 8 stays in place:

Thursday, February 2, 2012
South Africa: Murderers Of Lesbian Sentenced
Mamba Online reports:
LGBT activists have welcomed the sentencing of four men found guilty of brutally murdering 19-year-old lesbian Zoliswa Nkonyana in 2006, describing it as a victory. But is it really?On Wednesday, the Khayelitsha Regional Court sentenced Lubabalo Ntlabathi, Sicelo Mase, Luyanda Londzi and Mbulelo Damba to 18 years in prison, four of which were suspended for five years.Prosecutors had asked Magistrate Raadiya Whaten for a sentence of 15 years for the men’s appalling crime of stoning and stabbing Zoliswa to death in Khayelitsha in the Western Cape, just meters from her home. They killed her simply because they were disgusted by the fact that she was proudly and openly a lesbian."We’re very satisfied with the sentence," Jayne Arnott, Director of Western Cape LGBT rights group Triangle Project, told Mambaonline."It’s a victory for the community at large as well as a victory for lesbian and civil society organisations working against discrimination and homophobia."When I asked Arnott if the sentence was not rather weak for a brutal murder, she explained that the magistrate had many factors to weigh up."Mainly that the killers were juveniles when they committed the crime - and in light of that she made a fair judgment. We do recognise the complexity of the case".Most importantly, said Arnott, the issue of Zoliswa’s sexual orientation and the hate crime nature of the attack was highlighted by the magistrate in her sentencing."She gave quite a bit of focus on the issue of Zoliswa being a lesbian as an aggravating factor in the sentencing. She accepted our oral evidence for the state on this. She recognised that the motive was clearly discrimination against Zoliswa and that this was a motivating factor in the murder. I think that it will set a precedent."The magistrate, said Arnott, wanted to send a clear message to the community that Zoliswa had the right to live openly as a lesbian in the community.The case is the second in recent weeks in which LGBT groups have been allowed to testify in court in the sentencing phase of a trial on the impact of hate crimes on the community and among LGBT people.This trend hopefully reflects a growing awareness in the justice system of the heinous nature of hate crimes, something which South African law still does not recognise as a category of crime.OUT, based in Pretoria, recently testified in the sentencing of three men who were found guilty of brutally beating a young, black, gay man in a bar in October 2007.The six-year-long trial of Zoliswa’s killers has been a tortuous and long one. It was characterised by repeated delays, over 40, giving the whole affair an element of absurdity.Defence attorneys routinely missed court dates without any repercussions and witnesses began to falter in their testimony due to the long span of time between the murder and their court appearances.Nine men were originally charged with Zoliswa’s murder, but five were acquitted due to lack of evidence, with suggestions that police incompetence was to blame. Farcically, in September 2010 four of the accused managed to escape from the court (apparently with the help of an officer) but were later recaptured.Arnott noted that much had been learned in the long process of ensuring justice for Zoliswa."I think we have learned the importance of coordinating and working with the state prosecutors, keeping a presence and keeping active throughout the process and finding ways of introducing evidence to the court that is relevant."We are very pleased that we now have a precedent that other organisations can use when looking at issues of hate and discrimination."When one considers the extreme effort and commitment that they put into the trial I can’t blame Arnott and other activists in Khayelitsha for being satisfied with the case’s outcome. Without their ongoing pressure on the system we might well still be without any resolution to Zoliswa’s murder. For this they need to be applauded.Arnott believes that the sentence “will definitely have an impact,” and that “it will send a message in addressing issues of violence against particularly black lesbians in townships”."It’s a clear message that the justice system will not tolerate these kinds of crimes," she said. We can only hope that it will indeed play a part in stemming the brutalisation of lesbian women in South Africa.Nevertheless, the sentence strikes me as a somewhat hollow victory. Eighteen years in jail in exchange for a young woman’s life seems inappropriate. And what of other victims? Will they too face years of delays and incompetence in the criminal justice system?Until we have fixed the broken and flawed system that in many ways repeatedly failed Zoliswa, and will likely continue to fail others like her, she will not truly have justice.

South Africa: Murderers Of Lesbian Sentenced

Mamba Online reports:

LGBT activists have welcomed the sentencing of four men found guilty of brutally murdering 19-year-old lesbian Zoliswa Nkonyana in 2006, describing it as a victory. But is it really?On Wednesday, the Khayelitsha Regional Court sentenced Lubabalo Ntlabathi, Sicelo Mase, Luyanda Londzi and Mbulelo Damba to 18 years in prison, four of which were suspended for five years.Prosecutors had asked Magistrate Raadiya Whaten for a sentence of 15 years for the men’s appalling crime of stoning and stabbing Zoliswa to death in Khayelitsha in the Western Cape, just meters from her home. They killed her simply because they were disgusted by the fact that she was proudly and openly a lesbian."We’re very satisfied with the sentence," Jayne Arnott, Director of Western Cape LGBT rights group Triangle Project, told Mambaonline."It’s a victory for the community at large as well as a victory for lesbian and civil society organisations working against discrimination and homophobia."When I asked Arnott if the sentence was not rather weak for a brutal murder, she explained that the magistrate had many factors to weigh up."Mainly that the killers were juveniles when they committed the crime - and in light of that she made a fair judgment. We do recognise the complexity of the case".Most importantly, said Arnott, the issue of Zoliswa’s sexual orientation and the hate crime nature of the attack was highlighted by the magistrate in her sentencing."She gave quite a bit of focus on the issue of Zoliswa being a lesbian as an aggravating factor in the sentencing. She accepted our oral evidence for the state on this. She recognised that the motive was clearly discrimination against Zoliswa and that this was a motivating factor in the murder. I think that it will set a precedent."The magistrate, said Arnott, wanted to send a clear message to the community that Zoliswa had the right to live openly as a lesbian in the community.The case is the second in recent weeks in which LGBT groups have been allowed to testify in court in the sentencing phase of a trial on the impact of hate crimes on the community and among LGBT people.This trend hopefully reflects a growing awareness in the justice system of the heinous nature of hate crimes, something which South African law still does not recognise as a category of crime.OUT, based in Pretoria, recently testified in the sentencing of three men who were found guilty of brutally beating a young, black, gay man in a bar in October 2007.The six-year-long trial of Zoliswa’s killers has been a tortuous and long one. It was characterised by repeated delays, over 40, giving the whole affair an element of absurdity.Defence attorneys routinely missed court dates without any repercussions and witnesses began to falter in their testimony due to the long span of time between the murder and their court appearances.Nine men were originally charged with Zoliswa’s murder, but five were acquitted due to lack of evidence, with suggestions that police incompetence was to blame. Farcically, in September 2010 four of the accused managed to escape from the court (apparently with the help of an officer) but were later recaptured.Arnott noted that much had been learned in the long process of ensuring justice for Zoliswa."I think we have learned the importance of coordinating and working with the state prosecutors, keeping a presence and keeping active throughout the process and finding ways of introducing evidence to the court that is relevant."We are very pleased that we now have a precedent that other organisations can use when looking at issues of hate and discrimination."When one considers the extreme effort and commitment that they put into the trial I can’t blame Arnott and other activists in Khayelitsha for being satisfied with the case’s outcome. Without their ongoing pressure on the system we might well still be without any resolution to Zoliswa’s murder. For this they need to be applauded.Arnott believes that the sentence “will definitely have an impact,” and that “it will send a message in addressing issues of violence against particularly black lesbians in townships”."It’s a clear message that the justice system will not tolerate these kinds of crimes," she said. We can only hope that it will indeed play a part in stemming the brutalisation of lesbian women in South Africa.Nevertheless, the sentence strikes me as a somewhat hollow victory. Eighteen years in jail in exchange for a young woman’s life seems inappropriate. And what of other victims? Will they too face years of delays and incompetence in the criminal justice system?Until we have fixed the broken and flawed system that in many ways repeatedly failed Zoliswa, and will likely continue to fail others like her, she will not truly have justice.
Monday, January 23, 2012

Friday, January 20, 2012

United Kingdom: Three Anti-Gay Leaflet Defendants Guilty

Pink News UK reports:

Three of the defendants accused of stirring up hatred on the grounds of sexual orientation have been found guilty by a jury in Derby.Five Muslim men stood trial at Derby Crown Court on the charges, which carry a maximum sentence of seven years in prison and an unlimited fine.They are the first convictions under the newly-created laws.Ihjaz Ali, Kabir Ahmed and Razwan Javed had distributed a leaflet entitled ‘The Death Penalty?’ outside their mosque ahead of a gay Pride parade.It contained an image of a mannequin hanging from a noose and quoted Muslim texts.The Public Order Act 1986 was amended by the Criminal Justice and Immigration Act 2008 to create the offence of intentionally stirring up hatred on the grounds of sexual orientation, and these was the first-ever trial under the offence.In order to convict, the jury had to be convinced the leaflets were not just insulting or abusive, but were “threatening”, and were distributed with the intention of stirring up hatred.Umer Javed, 38 and Mehboob Hassain, 45 were acquitted by the jury.Sue Hemming, head of the CPS Special Crime and Counter Terrorism Division said: “A court has heard for the first time from witnesses how they felt, as gay men, when they read a leaflet calling for the death penalty for homosexuals.“The leaflet which led to this prosecution showed a manikin hanging from a noose and said gay people were destined to go to hell. The jury was told by one witness that he felt he was being targeted and he feared he would ‘be burned’.“Everyone has a right to be protected by the law and we regard homophobic crimes, along with all hate crimes, as particularly serious because they undermine people’s right to feel safe.“While people are entitled to hold extreme opinions which others may find unpleasant and obnoxious, they are not entitled to distribute those opinions in a threatening manner intending to stir up hatred against gay people.“This case was not about curtailing people’s religious views or preventing them from educating others about those views; it was that any such views should be expressed in a lawful manner and not incite others to hatred.”Ahmed, 28, had claimed the wording and images in the leaflets, handed out in Normanton ahead of a gay Pride march, were not threatening.He had told the court: “We are living in a society and if we don’t stop it, something like a tsunami will happen here, something on that scale.”He added: “We are trying to stand and voice on these issues. I am part of this country – I was born here.“You can think of it as a little vigilante thing.”Ahmed had told the court he saw it as his “duty as a Muslim to spread what God says about homosexuality. The references on the leaflets are historical facts and quote from the Koran.”Gay men appeared in Derby Crown Court to tell of their experience receiving the leaflets, which questioned whether gays should be executed.One believed he was the victim of a hate campaign, and said: “They made me feel terrorised in my own home. Sometimes I wondered whether I would be getting a burning rag through the letterbox or if I would be attacked in the street.”Ben Summerskill, Stonewall Chief Executive, said: “We’re satisfied to see these extremists convicted for distributing offensive and inflammatory leaflets that suggested gay people should be burnt or stoned to death.“This case vindicates Stonewall’s long fight to secure specific legal protection for gay people against incitement to hatred. Witnesses told the court they felt threatened and deeply fearful in their own homes.“People from all communities will feel safer knowing that the law now makes it harder to stir up hatred and violence against gay people.”Ali, Ahmed and Javed will be sentenced on 10 February 2012.

United Kingdom: Three Anti-Gay Leaflet Defendants Guilty

Pink News UK reports:

Three of the defendants accused of stirring up hatred on the grounds of sexual orientation have been found guilty by a jury in Derby.
Five Muslim men stood trial at Derby Crown Court on the charges, which carry a maximum sentence of seven years in prison and an unlimited fine.
They are the first convictions under the newly-created laws.
Ihjaz Ali, Kabir Ahmed and Razwan Javed had distributed a leaflet entitled ‘The Death Penalty?’ outside their mosque ahead of a gay Pride parade.
It contained an image of a mannequin hanging from a noose and quoted Muslim texts.
The Public Order Act 1986 was amended by the Criminal Justice and Immigration Act 2008 to create the offence of intentionally stirring up hatred on the grounds of sexual orientation, and these was the first-ever trial under the offence.
In order to convict, the jury had to be convinced the leaflets were not just insulting or abusive, but were “threatening”, and were distributed with the intention of stirring up hatred.
Umer Javed, 38 and Mehboob Hassain, 45 were acquitted by the jury.
Sue Hemming, head of the CPS Special Crime and Counter Terrorism Division said: “A court has heard for the first time from witnesses how they felt, as gay men, when they read a leaflet calling for the death penalty for homosexuals.
“The leaflet which led to this prosecution showed a manikin hanging from a noose and said gay people were destined to go to hell. The jury was told by one witness that he felt he was being targeted and he feared he would ‘be burned’.
“Everyone has a right to be protected by the law and we regard homophobic crimes, along with all hate crimes, as particularly serious because they undermine people’s right to feel safe.
“While people are entitled to hold extreme opinions which others may find unpleasant and obnoxious, they are not entitled to distribute those opinions in a threatening manner intending to stir up hatred against gay people.
“This case was not about curtailing people’s religious views or preventing them from educating others about those views; it was that any such views should be expressed in a lawful manner and not incite others to hatred.”
Ahmed, 28, had claimed the wording and images in the leaflets, handed out in Normanton ahead of a gay Pride march, were not threatening.
He had told the court: “We are living in a society and if we don’t stop it, something like a tsunami will happen here, something on that scale.”
He added: “We are trying to stand and voice on these issues. I am part of this country – I was born here.
“You can think of it as a little vigilante thing.”
Ahmed had told the court he saw it as his “duty as a Muslim to spread what God says about homosexuality. The references on the leaflets are historical facts and quote from the Koran.”
Gay men appeared in Derby Crown Court to tell of their experience receiving the leaflets, which questioned whether gays should be executed.
One believed he was the victim of a hate campaign, and said: “They made me feel terrorised in my own home. Sometimes I wondered whether I would be getting a burning rag through the letterbox or if I would be attacked in the street.”
Ben Summerskill, Stonewall Chief Executive, said: “We’re satisfied to see these extremists convicted for distributing offensive and inflammatory leaflets that suggested gay people should be burnt or stoned to death.
“This case vindicates Stonewall’s long fight to secure specific legal protection for gay people against incitement to hatred. Witnesses told the court they felt threatened and deeply fearful in their own homes.
“People from all communities will feel safer knowing that the law now makes it harder to stir up hatred and violence against gay people.”
Ali, Ahmed and Javed will be sentenced on 10 February 2012.

Monday, December 12, 2011

HIV Is Not A Crime